Overview

Cultural resource management in the United States often requires basic awareness and some knowledge of indigenous populations. Understand what they are, their differences, and where they are today. Learn some basic history on Native America and examine the legacy of treaties, Indian law, and the unique legal standing of tribes. Consider how stereotypes, cultural appropriation, and the media affect actions and become informed in ways that respect native cultural heritage. Explore how preserving history and culture can be integrated into projects that affect Native American cultural interests.

Agenda

  • Who are the indigenous populations in the United States
  • What are their differences
  • Where are they today
  • Most people have no idea what tribes went through—some basic history will help
  • Treaties and other legal agreements
  • Indian law and legal terms
  • Stereotypes, cultural appropriation, and media
  • Words, phrases, and other things to avoid in general
  • Preserving history and culture in the 21st century

Training Curriculum

90-minute, on-demand eLearning

  • 1

    Welcome Letter

    • NPI Welcome Letter

  • 2

    Videos

    • Native America 101: Chapter 1

    • Native America 101: Chapter 2

    • Native America 101: Chapter 3

    • Native America 101: Chapter 4

    • Native America 101: Chapter 5

    • Native America 101: Chapter 6

  • 3

    Download Course Slides

    • Native America 101 (slide deck)

  • 4

    Download Video Transcript

    • Native America 101 (transcript)

  • 5

    Course Evaluation

    • NPI Evaluation

Faculty

Faculty

Eric Hemenway

Eric Hemenway, repatriation specialist and former NAGPRA Review Committee member, Anishinaabe, worked on numerous NAGPRA repatriation and disposition claims, coordination of repatriation involving multiple tribes, and reburials, managed NAGPRA grants, and consulted with museums across the country on appropriate care of NAGPRA materials
Full Bio/CV
Preserving Native American History with Eric Hemenway is part of NPI's Preservation Profiles podcast series

Participants

This training is suitable for

  • Members, staff, and other practitioners of cultural resource conservation from Indian tribes

  • Alaska Native villages, Native Hawaiian organizations, indigenous communities

  • THPOs, SHPOs, government agencies, museums, and preservation and environmental contractors

Immediate Access

Scholarships

Scholarships covering tuition fees for NPI online trainings are available for participants who show a justifiable need for training and tuition assistance. Read more and download the application.

Additionally, National NAGPRA Program scholarships covering tuition fees for several NPI seminars may be available for participants from museums and federally recognized tribes, Alaska Native villages, or Native Hawaiian organizations. Read more and download application.

Customized Training

NPI also offers eLearning and webinar modules as customized training to meet specific organizational needs. They can be tailored to create training at a time convenient to the sponsor. Contact NPI at 703.765.0100 or info@npi.org for further information.